The modern classification of rapidly growing economies as newly industrializing countries nics

A survey in eight developing countries. Journal of Biosocial Science Vol 19 3 Jul

The modern classification of rapidly growing economies as newly industrializing countries nics

Adapted from Smitka A fourth consequence of these networks is that they permit an externalization of development costs and the associated overhead.

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The uneasy and distrustful relationships between Fordist firms and their suppliers have led auto companies to design components in-house and then convey precisely detailed drawings and specifications to their suppliers. As a result, Fordist firms are forced to carry most of the engineering and design costs as well as the associated overhead.

The modern classification of rapidly growing economies as newly industrializing countries nics

In lean networks, suppliers perform this function in addition to actually manufacturing the parts Helper, ; As a result, main firms are freed from a considerable portion of the cost burden and overhead of product design.

The final two differences between the organizational logics of Fordism and lean production are interrelated. One is inventory practices, which directly impacts on component quality, and the other, which is a consequence of inventory practices, is the spatial distribution of production.

As already noted, production of large stocks of parts combined with lax in-process quality control often led to large runs of defective parts. These large runs of parts also meant that considerations of proximity between component producers and main company were not extremely important.

If a supplier provided a 60 day supply with each delivery, the supplier could be located anywhere in the country, if not the world, hence, transnational production.

The only requirement was that deliveries arrived at the proper intervals. Under a "just in time" system, suppliers produce components in small batches and deliver these to the main company as needed, often as frequently as two or three times a day.

These parts are then assembled into vehicles almost immediately. Not only does "just in time" reduce the capital and the amount of storage space devoted to intermediate inventories but it also quickly reveals any manufacturing defects so that these can be rectified before the next batch arrives.

Because JIT operates on the basis of frequent deliveries, spatial proximity becomes a paramount consideration. Suppliers must be relatively close to the main company, if not clustered around the main company as in the most extreme case of Toyota City in Japan.

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To a large extent, the successful transplantation of lean production to North America and Europe by Japanese automobile companies was at the heart of arguments that the shift of production to low wage countries would halt. While proponents of this view may not use the term lean production, they suggest that the emulation and spread of these methods in the core regions will halt and eventually reverse the flight of production to low wage areas for three reasons Womack, First, lean production drastically reduces labor content and this, in conjunction with political and economic instability of low wage regions, diminishes the lure of low wage areas.

Second, the newly industrializing countries have neither the skills nor the infrastructure to support the new manufacturing technologies and techniques. Third, it is logistically "desirable", especially for just-in-time production, to have the majority of manufacturing operations not only located in a given market but in proximity.

Some even assert that manufacturing activities expelled from North America over the prior 20 years will eventually return Castells and Tyson, ; Junne, ; Drucker, ; Lawrence and Litan, ; Sanderson, Whether expelled activities will return is unclear, but there is wide consensus that the diffusion of lean techniques, especially in automobile production, will result in a spatial restructuring and a new geography of production in North America.

North American automobile producers will abandon the previous pattern of geographical dispersion and adopt a spatial distribution more akin to the regional concentration in Japan. Restructuring will occur largely by abandoning older sites in Michigan, California and the Northeast and moving to new greenfield sites in the Midwest Hill, ; Ishi, ; Mair et al.

Low-Wage Lean Production Although some manufacturing complexes have developed in the United States and Canada around Japanese transplants as well as newer plants built by North American producers, the relocation of automobile and component production to Mexico appears to be a far more significant trend for the future of North American automobile production.

Engine exports, mainly to Canada and the U. Vehicle exports grew from 14, tobetween and Shaiken, and, over the next three years, more than doubled, reaching a figure ofin Werner, The most important reason for this growth in Mexican production is the lure of low wages.

Although advanced production technologies reduce the amount of labor required for production, reducing wages costs still remains of fundamental importance for auto production. Mexican greenfield sites, like greenfield sites in Japan and the United States, 17 shift production from urban centers to rural areas in order to take advantage of lower labor costs and a more tractable work force.

According to Middlebrookwage costs in the north of Mexico are markedly lower for two reasons: Workers in northern Mexican are more tractable for several reasons. They have little experience in industry and industrial conflict and, unlike workers in Mexico city who are organized into militant "democratic unions," these workers are organized by the CTM Confederation of Mexican Workers which has "close ties to the government" and a "generally cooperative attitude towards management" Middlebrook, Unlike the older workers and militant unions in Mexico city which resisted the implementation of lean techniques, the CTM affiliated unions in the north wholeheartedly embraced lean techniques such as rotation, multi-tasking, work teams and the elimination of both seniority based promotions and restrictive job classifications.

Where is North American Automobile Production Headed?: Low-Wage Lean Production

As a result, many of the new Mexican plants have the same flexibility as the best lean plants. In addition, the normal work shift in these plants is 9. Middlebrook, ; Shaiken, Finally, unlike the previous tendency among auto producers to export old equipment and manufacture outdated models for sale in peripheral markets, 18 most of the newer component and assembly plants in Mexico are close to "state of the art" Shaiken, Where previously Mexican production was for local sales or American companies manufactured "gas guzzling models" for export to the U.

Hermosillo represents the most advanced assembly plant in all of North America, and maybe the world, with the best quality of the 80 plants, including Japanese plants and transplants, examined by Womack et al.Nickel use is growing at about 4% each year while use of nickel-containing stainless steel is growing at about 6%.

The fastest growth today is seen in the newly and rapidly industrializing countries, especially in Asia. Where is North American Automobile Production Headed?: Low-Wage Lean Production. Carl H.A. Dassbach the newly industrializing countries have neither the skills nor the infrastructure to support the new manufacturing technologies and techniques.

The modern classification of rapidly growing economies as newly industrializing countries nics

Third, it is logistically "desirable", especially for just-in-time production, to . Newly-industrialized countries shown in blue, developing countries are shown in green, Baltic Tigers in red, developing unrecognised countries in light green ().

The category of newly-industrialized country (NIC) is a socioeconomic classification applied to several countries around the world by political scientists and economists. growing, newly industrialized countries (NICs)—Singapore, South Korea, and Taiwan, as well as Hong Kong—but also from other developing countries including Brazil, Argentina, and Turkey.

The concessions to LDCs under the Uruguay Round notwithstanding, African coun-tries will have to engineer their accelerated growth under conditions remarkably unlike those under which the mature market economies and the newly industrializing countries (NICs) of Asia and Latin America attained their transformation.

There has been much discussion of the Newly Industrializing Countries (NICs) in recent years and various studies of their impact have been made. Much of the concern about NICs in the industrialized countries is however based on what they portend for the future rather than their present impact. This. The category of newly industrialized country is a socioeconomic classification applied to several countries around the world by political scientists and economists. NICs are countries whose economies have not yet reached developed country status but have, in a macroeconomic sense, . The term newly industrialized country ("NIC") is an economic classification used by economists to represent economies that fall somewhere between a developed country and a developing iridis-photo-restoration.com countries falling under this categorization are characterized by rapid export-driven economic growth and a secular migration of workers from rural to urban areas.

Usually all countries which are neither a developed country nor a failed state are classified as developing countries. Countries with more advanced economies than other developing nations, but which have not yet fully demonstrated the signs of a developed country, are grouped under the term newly industrialized countries.

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